bLog

Browsers, detection and segmentation.

  • Segment market share statistics, December 2017

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    Desktop browsers are still – but only barely – the most common way of browsing the web, representing approximately 49% of page visits (vs. 60% back in June 2015). Mobile browser numbers are still climbing and mobile/smartphones now represent approximately 46% of the total page visits (up from 35% in 2015), while tablets is stable on about 5%.

  • The Chrome Browser

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    In 2008 Google released the first version of Google Chrome based on Apples WebKit engine. The browser was a remarkable improvement for Windows users which didn't have access to a WebKit browser yet. Since then the WebKit based browsers have become a dominant player on both desktop and mobile devices. In 2013 Chrome switched to a WebKit fork named Blink to allow more freedom for the Chrome development.

  • The Firefox browser

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    Firefox is an open source browser developed by the Mozilla foundation. Firefox is by all means a full feature browser and one of the few browsers with its own rendering engine as more and more producers switch to the WebKit engine.

  • The Safari browser

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    In 2003 Apple released the first version of Safari, using a fork of the KHTML rendering engine they called WebKit. Safari became the default browser of the OS X series and the rendering engine has been adopted by a wide range of browsers since then, most notably Google Chrome uses a WebKit fork called Blink.

  • The Edge browser

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    Microsoft Edge is the successor to the infamous Internet Explorer. It was first released in 2015, with a strong orientation towards web standards. When it first came out it almost parred it's competitors, but since then, possibly due to a very slow adoption, development has slowed down.

  • The Internet Explorer browser

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    Internet Explorer is the default browser for the Windows OS, first released in 1995 to compete with Netscape. During 2002 and 2003 it had a market share of about 95% but the market share declined with the release of Firefox and later Chrome.

  • The desktop segment

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    The desktop segment contains modern desktop browsers like Chrome 49+ , Firefox 49+ , Safari 10+ and Edge 13+. The purpose is to be able to target all modern browsers in one segment, to enable using the newest technology, without the need for extensive hacks or polyfills, which impairs performance. (~41%, 2017)

  • The desktop_ie11 segment

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    The desktop_ie11 segment is a compromise to meet IE halfway. As IE11 is still more used than it's replacement, Edge, it could be a candidate for the desktop segment, but it is just not good enough. In some cases the lack of features are not important - in other cases they are vital. Giving it its own segment is the most flexible approach as developers can then individually decide how to group it with other segments. (3%, 2017)

  • The desktop_ie10 segment

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    The desktop_ie10 segment is compromise to meet IE halfway. It hardly makes any sense anymore, but we'll keep it for another round. Giving it its own segment is the most flexible approach as developers can then individually decide how to group it with other segments. (0%, 2017)

  • The desktop_ie9 segment

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    The desktop_ie9 segment is a somewhat sad compromise. Feature wise it does not deserve its own segment and should simply be degraded to desktop_light. Despite a low public market share some large corporations and organizations still use this browser internally and thus it is still occasionally a part of the primary support requirement. Therefore degradation is not a valid approach. Giving it its own segment seemed to be the most flexible approach as developers can then individually decide how to group it with other segments. (1%, 2017)

  • The desktop_light segment

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    The desktop_light segment basically covers all older desktop browsers as far back as the earliest Netscapes and Internet Explorers. It is considered a fallback segment to ensure even old browsers can be supported if so desired. (3%, 2017)

  • The tablet segment

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    The tablet segment contains the most modern tablet browsers like Chrome 49+ , Firefox 49+ and Safari 10+. This covers iOS 9+ and Android 4+. (4%, 2017)

  • The tablet_light segment

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    The tablet_light segment starts with the earliest iPads and Android tablets. It contains tablet OS' like the Android 2.3-4.1 and iOS 3-8. Anything falling below the tablet_light specifications will be indexed as mobile. (1%, 2017)

  • The smartphone segment

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    The smartphone segment includes smartphones with Safari 10+, Chrome 49+, Firefox 49+ or Edge 13. It is advanced browsers but with limited screen sizes and processing power, compared to desktop computers. (37%, 2017)

  • The mobile segment

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    The mobile segment includes mobile- and feature phones released within the past 5 years. They have small screens and limited support for JavaScript and CSS due to limited processing power. (8%, 2017)

  • The mobile_light segment

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    The mobile_light segment includes mobilephones released within the past 15 years. The have very small screens and limited support for CSS and likely no support for JavaScript. (1%, 2017)

  • The tv segment

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    The tv segment covers TVs and console devices with internet access, using the remote control or game pad for navigation and interaction. Like Playstation 3, Nintendo Wii and SMART-TVs. Featurewise this is a very broad segment as the browsers in these devices range from very old NetFront mobile browsers to state of the art WebKit browsers. (0%, 2017)

  • The seo segment

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    The seo segment is a purely semantic segment targeting search engines, content aggregators and screen readers for the visually impaired. This is just minimal and well structured content in HTML - nothing more, nothing less. It's for machines, not for people.

  • The Baidu browser

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  • Release of Detector v3.1

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    Ever wished for serverside Detector in Java, an advanced drag'n'drop segment builder or a /text api endpoint, returning the segment as plain text?

  • Segment market share statistics, June 2015

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    Desktop browsers still dominate with about 60% of page visits. Mobile phones take up about 35%, while the tablets only have a 5% market share. Modern browsers across platforms make up about 80% of page visits.

  • The Detector method

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    The Detector identification is unique because it groups all browsers in unambiguous segments based on common denominators, allowing you to safely develop for a narrow target group within each segment. The browsers in each segment has a clearly specified level of JavaScript and CSS support, uses the same input method and has a limited screen resolution range.

  • The UC Browser

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    The UC Browser or UCWeb is a Chinese mobile browser first released in 2004. Initially it used a server proxy compression to speed up page rendering, using its own proprietary rendering engine (U1 + U2) and minimize data load. It currently has a leading market share in China and India.

  • The Opera browser

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    The Opera browser has been developed by Norwegian software developer Opera Software since 1995. The browser has played a major role in early mobile devices but today it is a rare sight for both desktop and mobile devices. Opera used to have it's own rendering engine, Presto, but with version 15 they switched to Blink.

  • The Teleca/Obigo browser

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    The Teleca/Obigo browser was created by Swedish company AU System in 1999. It was known as MIC (Mobile Internet Client) when it was released as the worlds first WAP browser. It played an important role in the very early years of WAP technology due to low memory requirements.

  • The Openwave/Myriad browser

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    The Openwave browser was a large player in the dawning mobile market and closely tied in with the development of the WAP protocol. In 2006 it was installed on almost 50% of all shipped mobile devices. In 2008 it was sold to Purple Labs and later changed its name to Myriad. As of version 9 the browser switched to WebKit.

  • The NetFront browser

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    The NetFront browser is produced by Japanese company Access Co. Ltd. By 2011 the NetFront browser has been embedded in more than 1 billion devices. The browser is still being embedded in devices but is no longer considered an important player.

  • The SEMC browser

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    The homegrown mobile browser of SonyEricsson Mobile Company was a very early mobile browser optimized for the WAP-protocol. It never really made a serious entry in the HTML scene.